Inspired Counsels of Ellen White

Inspired Counsels of Ellen White

 
For the past 4-6 weeks I have sought to sensitize, inform and encourage a greater respect for the works and inspired ministry of Ellen White. Today, I present my final article on the subject. In fact, it was my intention to conclude two week ago but owing to a series of quotes employed in the recent Geoscience Conference on Origins, held in Venice, Italy, of which I was privileged to attend from June 23 – July 2, I thought it necessary to add this final article. Therefore the quotes presented, relating to “Restraining Without Obscuring Truth,” “Meeting Opposition” and “Role Model – Religion Isn’t Limiting,” are of great significance.
 
Restraining Without Obscuring Truth
Prepare the Soil Before Sowing the Seed. In laboring in a new field, do not think it your duty to say at once to the people, We are Seventh-day Adventists; we believe that the seventh day is the Sabbath; we believe in the non immortality of the soul. This would often erect a formidable barrier between you and those you wish to reach. Speak to them, as you have opportunity, upon points of doctrine on which you can agree. Dwell on the necessity of practical godliness. Give them evidence that you are a Christian, desiring peace, and that you love their souls. Let them see that you are conscientious. Thus you will gain their confidence; and there will be time enough for doctrines. Let the heart be won, the soil prepared, and then sow the seed, presenting in love the truth as it is in Jesus.—Gospel Workers, pp. 119, 120.  (1915). – {Evangelism, p. 200.2}
 
Do not at the outset press before the people the most objectionable features of our faith, lest you close their ears to which these things come as a new revelation. Let such portions of truth be dealt out to them as they may be able to grasp and appreciate; though it should appear strange and startling, many will recognize with joy the new light that is shed on the Word of God, whereas if truth were presented in so large a measure that they could not receive it, some would go away, and never come again. More than this, they would misrepresent the truth.—The General Conference Bulletin, February 25, 1895. – {Evangelism, p. 201.1}
 
Meeting Opposition
The Lord wants His people to follow other methods than that of condemning wrong, even though the condemnation be just. He wants us to do something more than to hurl at our adversaries charges that only drive them further from the truth. The work which Christ came to do in our world was not to erect barriers and constantly thrust upon the people the fact that they were wrong (Testimonies, vol. 6, p. 121).
 
In the advocacy of the truth the bitterest opponents should be treated with respect and deference. ... treat every man as honest. Speak no word, do no deed, that will confirm any in unbelief (Testimonies, vol. 6, p. 122).
 
Do not, when referring to the Testimonies, feel it your duty to drive them home. In reading the Testimonies be sure not to mix in your filling of words, for this makes it impossible for the hearers to distinguish between the word of the Lord to them and your words. (Ibid)
 
Be sure that you do not make the word of the Lord offensive. We long to see reforms, and because we do not see that which we desire, an evil spirit is too often allowed to cast drops of gall into our cup, and thus others are embittered. By our ill-advised words their spirit is chafed, and they are stirred to rebellion. (Ibid)
 
Role Model – Religion Isn’t Limiting
Dear youth, what is the aim and purpose of your life? Are you ambitious for education that you may have a name and position in the world? Have you thoughts that you dare not express, that you may one day stand upon the summit of intellectual greatness; that you may sit in deliberative and legislative councils, and help to enact laws for the nation? There is nothing wrong in these aspirations. You may every one of you make your mark. You should be content with no mean attainments. Aim high, and spare no pains to reach the standard (Messages to Young People, p. 36).