Do We Restrict the Truth in Public Evangelism?

Do We Restrict the Truth in Public Evangelism?
 

Given the previous article about Attacking Other Churches, I thought to present the other side of the coin. So for those of you who questioned and constructively criticized, here is it.
 
Do We Suppress the Truth?
In the response to the above question, the answer is no.  The truth is the truth, and it can stand on its own. Therefore, one does not need to restrict truth, in the same way that you cannot condense light (101 Questions Adventists Ask).  Beach and Graz argue that, in presenting truth, we must take into consideration the cultural background, education, and perhaps the prejudices of those we are trying to reach.  In dealing with evangelistic food, the writer to the Hebrews uses the expressions milk and strong meat, suggesting that some people, in their capacity to absorb solid doctrine, are more like infants who need liquid nourishment more than solid food (see Hebrews 5:12).
 
How Best Do We Present Truth?
It should be noted, the issue is not whether we should restrict or even hide the truth, but rather how best to fulfill the great evangelistic commission. As noted in last weeks weekly, it does not make sense in bullying ones way upon the evangelistic scene like the proverbial bull in a china shop. Damage is certain to result if a wise approach is not pursued. Imagine going into a setting where Local people may have been warned and told all kinds of innuendoes or falsehoods about our Church. Beach and Graz point out that In such a case, a pedagogically sound approach may be to proceed slowly and in stages, first establishing credibility and sincerity, and revealing honest, caring concern for the welfare and salvation of human beings.
 
Lack of Religious Liberty
Another problem that tends to contribute to restriction is the serious lack of religious liberty in some countries.  In such places, the public preaching of our message is severely restricted, and at times it is prohibited to preach at all.  In other countries, great care and sensitivity, almost needing a sixth sense, must be used.  There are countries where talking about false prophets, apostasy, and calling for conversion to authentic Christianity, would immediately result in closing down our work and even perhaps subjecting the preachers of our message and converts to the death penalty, because of what is seen as blasphemy or apostasy or treason. Fortunately, this does not obtain to such severity in the Bahamas, Cayman and Turks and Caicos Islands. Nevertheless, we need to be aware and be responsible.
Ellen G. White in speaking on this matter advised, It is not the best policy to be so very explicit, and say all upon a point that can be said, when a few arguments will cover the groundIt is a better plan to keep a reserve of arguments will cover the groundIt is a better plan to keep a reserve of arguments than to pour out a depth of knowledge upon a subject (Counsels to Writers and Editors, p. 56).